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  4.  » Can you put a ‘granny cam’ in an Illinois nursing home?

Can you put a ‘granny cam’ in an Illinois nursing home?

| Dec 15, 2020 | Insurance Companies And Negligent Parties Fear Us For A Reason |

Nursing home neglect and abuse are serious problems — and they can make those whose loved ones are in a nursing home feel helpless. When you ask questions of the staff or administration about your loved one’s declining mental state, the bruises you see or other concerns that you have, you’re told that their condition is a reflection of their age and nothing more.

Yet you have your doubts. You wish there was a way to monitor the situation more closely. That’s where “granny cams” come in.

Illinois law gives you the right to monitor your loved one’s room

Under the Authorized Electronic Monitoring in Long-Term Care Facilities Act, passed in 2016, surveillance cameras are permitted in nursing home rooms under the following conditions:

  • The cameras must be visible and placed in a conspicuous location (not hidden, for example, in a teddy bear).
  • Signs must be displayed outside the room and the facility to notify visitors and employees that electronic monitoring is in place.
  • Your loved one (and their roommate, if they have one) must consent to the electronic monitoring.
  • The recording must not capture audio, and it must not be used to record things like the resident getting dressed or undressed.

If you capture abuse or neglect on camera, what next?

Nursing home staff are the ones responsible for neglect, while staff, other residents and visitors can be responsible for abuse. If your loved one has suffered from neglect or abuse in a nursing home, an experienced attorney can provide guidance and help you determine the best course of action.

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