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  4.  » Surgeon performs surgery on wrong eye and second in recovery room

Surgeon performs surgery on wrong eye and second in recovery room

| May 14, 2019 | Insurance Companies And Negligent Parties Fear Us For A Reason |

There’s nothing scarier than the potential for a surgeon to operate on the wrong body part. For example, if you need a corrective surgery on your right eye, going through surgery on the left could be extremely damaging.

Take, for example, the story of a 19-year-old woman who went into surgery for an operation to correct a lazy eye and to remove a cyst that had formed there. She consented to have surgery on the left eye, but the surgeon performed the surgery on the wrong eye.

The teen woke up from anesthesia confused and asked a nurse why the right eye was hurting when the surgery was for the left. It was a short time later that the surgeon returned and performed a second surgery on the correct eye.

The 19-year-old girl was awake and said she was in pain when the surgeon performed the second operation. Someone allegedly held down her head while the doctor operated. She told him to stop, according to her statement, but he did not.

The lawsuit against the provider states that he did not perform the second operation in a sterile environment and reused the same instruments from another surgical patient’s instrument tray. Since the botched operation, the teen says she struggles with double vision and other complications as a result of the actions of the surgeon.

This is a horrifying story to consider, especially knowing that the patient asked the surgeon to stop. In any case like this, it’s vital to make sure those who made errors are held responsible for their actions.

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