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  4.  » Minimally invasive surgery actually more dangerous, study claims

Minimally invasive surgery actually more dangerous, study claims

On Behalf of | Dec 12, 2018 | Insurance Companies And Negligent Parties Fear Us For A Reason |

In most cases, people believe that a less-invasive surgery is a safer surgery. It reduces the likelihood of infections, and it’s typically less damaging to the body. However, in studies of minimally invasive surgeries compared to open surgeries for radical hysterectomies, it was shown that the minimally invasive surgery was actually more dangerous.

The reasoning is sound. Women who had the minimally invasive surgery were more likely to have cancer return than those who opted for an open surgery. Women with a minimally invasive surgery had a four-times higher chance of having their cancer return, and they have a lower chance of three-year survival. Open-surgery patients had a three-year survival rate of around 99 percent, while minimally invasive surgeries had a survival rate of around 94 percent.

Why do people have a higher risk of cancer recurrence with minimally invasive radical hysterectomies?

Researchers aren’t 100 percent sure, but there are some possible reasons such as using carbon dioxide to inflate the abdomen, which could encourage cancer cells spreading. Another possibility is that the manipulator, the tool used during the surgery, could be spreading cancerous tissues.

If your medical provider knows that there is a greater risk of death or recurrence of an illness but suggests a surgery despite that, you may be in a position where you can make a claim. Erroneous information given to a patient could influence their decisions and end up causing them more pain and suffering in the future. It should always be your right to choose the safest way to treat any condition you have.

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